Home Campus Production of 'Enchanted April' begins

Production of ‘Enchanted April’ begins

The set, actors and crew of “Enchanted April” fill the Snow Drama Theatre stage March 22 to 30, but for the magic to occur on stage, crew members worked months in advance putting everything together.

The set consisted of moving platforms and an Italian villa that filled nearly the entire stage. Design for the stage started eight months ago.

“In the set (built to look like) Italy  they basically built an entire Italian villa, but then they had to make it look like it’s been there for 100 years,” said Liz Chapman, a senior studying theatre and speech education, who plays Lotty, a protagonist in the story.

Asia Yates, a freshman studying theatre and speech education, is a member of the tech crew. She opperates one of the two cranks used to operate the moving set pieces.

“I usually act, but I enjoy all aspects of the theater,” Yates said. “With the theater though, the whole thing, everyone is striving for this one production to look good. So we can put on an amazing show and inspire others.”

The set pieces, set on a track, often have actors on them that they have to drag off stage, along with whatever furniture or set is already on it.

“It’s crazy,” Yates said. “I have to try and get it in the exact spot.”

The only set featured in the second act was the Italian villa. The large set piece was meant to convey the feeling of Mezzago, the Italian castle.

There were 12 to 40 people working on the set every day: designers, painters and carpenters.

“The set for this show is the most incredible scene I’ve ever seen and worked on,” Chapman said.

Chapman also said all of the costumes were custom designed by faculty and made by the faculty and the students.

The costumes don’t take themselves on and off though. Anneli Thompson, a junior studying music; Emily Gilbert, a junior studying photography; Katie Holland, a senior studying theatre and speech education; and Cassie Burton, a senior studying choral education, make the team of quick-change artists.

Not only do they have to change the actors’ clothing, both men and women, they also have to change accessories too.

The quickest change they have has to happen in 15 seconds.

“There are only two people that we have to change for that one though luckily, but everyone is coming off, and you have to juggle who comes off,” Holland said. “By the last show, you have it down to a science.”

The cast, although changed by these girls, are not necessarily well acquainted with them.

“I have no idea who’s changing me; it’s too dark to tell,” Chapman said.

The smooth transitions that they provide help make the play seamless.

“I thought we had a really good strong opening night; the audience was really responsive and the quick change was the best it’s ever been,” Chapman said.

Photo by LIZBETH JUAREZ | Scroll Photography

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