Home Campus As musicians and sisters

As musicians and sisters

The room was filled except for a few seats in the top two rows. There was chatter as everyone settled in their seat awaiting the recital to begin. As soon as the lights dimmed, the audience toned down and paid close attention to the woman introducing the first performance.

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The recital included 16 women singing and playing music from women musicians such as Clara Schumann, a German pianist; Lili Boulanger, a French composer; and Katherine Hoover, an American composer to name a few.

“I think this event is awesome,” said Shaina Mattei, a senior studying music. “It’s really nice. We are taking the time to recognize female composers. I think a lot of their music gets lost over time, so it’s really fun that we get to do this.”

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The recital included only one male composer, Franz Jospeh Haydn, but what made this first act special were the four female trombone players who performed passionately.

Throughout the recital, the audience watched intently as musician after musician came in and out. No bright lights could be seen from tiny screens, and all eyes seemed to be focused on the display of professionalism from the women on stage.

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Allison Vest accompanied half of the women, some as they sang, others as they played the cello, bass and bassoon. The variety in styles of music drove the audience through French, German, and Irish melodies.

“It’s exciting and it’s nice to be up there, but to be honest, it’s not my comfort zone,” said Diana Angulo, a senior studying music. “I never stop getting nervous, I just get used to the nerves.”

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Angulo shared her first composition at the recital named “Home,” hoping to insert a piece of Mexico into the snowy town of Rexburg as she concludes her last semester at BYU-Idaho.

“I really tried to portray what Mexico is for me, especially coming here to a place that is not mine, that is not my home,” Angulo said. “It definitely makes someone that is foreign to this country able to increase his or her love for their own country. For people to like this piece it’s to love what I love and it’s to love partly who I am.”

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The performers were given one last set of applause to thank them for their work. A standing ovation was also offered as they stood all in a line on stage and many were stopped to be reminded that their work is still paying off.

“I’m so proud of them,” said Elizabeth Crawford, a music professor, as she closed the recital with her own bassoon performance. “The best thing we can do as musicians is to support each other, especially as sisters.”

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