Home Campus Coeds find balance through slacklining

Coeds find balance through slacklining

Every Saturday night, BYU-Idaho students are offered a chance to try a unique activity.

Slacklining is located in the BYU Idaho-Center courts from 7-9 p.m.

“Slacklining is a balance sport practiced on a stretchy, synthetic webbing line (about 2.5 cm-5 cm wide) fixed between two points. Slack of course, means the opposite of taut, and this tells us that the line has a certain amount of give,” according to outdoorsportsteam.com.

Every week, people see the slacklines being set and rush to try it out, said Michael Packard, a manager of the weekly event and a Freshaman studying automotive technology.

“I got roped into helping out with this event by my roommate, but it is a lot of fun, and everyone is welcome,” Packard said.

Packard said that after hours of practice, he can get across the line every now and then.

Heather Swainston, a freshman studying computer information technology, said that slacklining is far more difficult than she anticipated before trying the activity.

“I wanted to do it for a long time, and it is definitely harder than I thought it would be, even though I am a person with really good balance,” said Lauren Baldwin, a junior studying English. “You shake like crazy.”

Sarah Sessions, a sophomore studying psychology, said slacklining is a lot harder than it looks because, it moves the line back and forth.

“It is almost impossible to do without falling,” Sessions said.

Chris Payne, a four-year veteran slackliner, and a Junior studying biology, said that he learned a variety of tricks on the slackline.

“I can now walk around, walk backwards, turn around and stand in different poses,” Payne said.

Alex Richey, a sophomore studying communication, said slacklining is incredibly difficult.

“I can’t believe people do this for recreation,” Richey said. “This is intense. You’re trying to look cool doing it, and you can’t because you are shaking so bad.”

Glen Taylor, a senior studying mechanical engineering said mastering slacklining takes time.

“Keep an eye on where you want to go, and stay relaxed,” Payne said. “If you tense , you won’t react as well, and if you are looking down, you fall.”

Benjamin Behymer, a freshman studying exercise physiology, who has been slacklining for two years said repetition is the secret to slacklining.

Behymer also said that after much practice the only things he can do is jump and land on the slackline.

“Even as an experienced slackliner, you don’t make it every time,” said Payne.

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