Home Campus Devotional cover: A consecrated life

Devotional cover: A consecrated life

On Tuesday, Sept. 13, in the BYU-Idaho Center, President Henry J. Eyring and his wife, Kelly Eyring, each gave devotional addresses to welcome students to the new semester.

Sister Eyring was the first to speak and shared various excerpts from Marjorie Pay Hinckley’s talk titled “Unsolicited, Unwelcome and Unwanted Advice From a Seventy-Five-Year-Old Woman to College Students.” Some of the advice she spoke of included participating in a variety of activities on campus and making religion a priority.

“At BYU-Idaho we have so many academic, artistic, service and social opportunities that you won’t be able to do them all,” Sister Eyring said as she went on to talk about religion. “Make religion an important part of your college life. A testimony comes from living the gospel and serving in the church.”

Following Sister Eyring’s remarks, President Eyring spoke about living a life of consecration in a world of constant commotion and the blessings that come with pursuing such a lifestyle.

“We members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints recognize the power of consecration in our lives,” President Eyring said. “Like the prophets and other saints of the past, we can connect to divine revelation and power. With time and steady effort, our consecration can change the world for the better.”

About halfway through his devotional address, President Eyring invited Richard Pieper, a mathematics professor who will be retiring after this semester, to share some insights on the topic of consecration. He shared the story of his great-grandfather Heinrich Friedrich Christian Pieper, who was one of the first to be baptized in Germany during this dispensation.

Pieper told the story of how his great-grandfather lived a consecrated life in the earlier days of the restoration. One of the ways in which he lived a consecrated life, according to Pieper, was through trusting in the Lord to be financially stable enough to send his son, Bill Pieper, on a mission.

“Brothers and sisters, the consecration of my great-grandfather, Chris, and my grandfather, Bill, and their good wives and families brought a power into their lives that can come in no other way,” Pieper said. “Their blessings and the blessings enjoyed by their posterity are the beautiful fruits of consecration.”

President Eyring ended his devotional address by giving a few examples of consecrated leaders in church history such as President Russell M. Nelson, Ebed-Melech from the Old Testament, and his mother, Kathleen Johnson Eyring. He invited those listening to pursue consecrated lives and receive the promised blessings for doing so.

“The key is to give our all to the giver of eternal life,” President Eyring said. “As we consecrate ourselves, He can lift us heavenward.”

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