Home Opinion Disney is our childhood’s Death Star

Disney is our childhood’s Death Star

Hark! I hear the familiar trumpets heralding a message of a new hope, sounding the dawn of a new chapter, nay, a new episode — dun dun dun duh dah.
And what’s all the fuss about? Oh, nothing. Just a $4.05 billion deal with a certain movie studio that has become a household name from Tokyo to Anaheim, California: Disney.
Disney announced on Oct. 30 their plans to purchase Lucasfilm from director George Lucas, creator of the beloved “Star Wars” films.
It’s official, Han Solo and Chewbacca fans. Disney has a monopoly on our childhood.
I don’t know about you but some of my earliest memories involve a man by the name of “Skywalker” having his hand sliced off and suffering from an identity crisis over who his real father is.
As news of this monumental acquisition trickled into Facebook newsfeeds everywhere, (because where else do you get your news from these days?) I was happy to see many friends also coming out of the closet.
Yes, I will confess my little secret: I am a “Star Wars” fan.
But the merger between entertainment conglomerate Disney and Lucasfilm was about equivalent to watching a bumbling Jar Jar Binks make his debut appearance in Episode I. It was cute for a while, but then the novelty wore off.
With the news of Disney’s monopoly, which spans from Pixar to Marvel and now to a galaxy far, far away, came the announcement of something bigger than Episode I being slated for a February 2012 3-D release.
“Star Wars: Episode VII.”
And the skeptics went crazy. There was no way the film could possibly live to the legend of George Lucas, especially under Disney’s white-gloved thumb.
Forbes Magazine reported that George Lucas has passed the buck on to a new generation of filmmakers.
A generation full of Toms-wearing, Apple-product-loving hipsters. A generation with thousands of dollars in student loan debts because it had spent years at institutions of higher learning, being instructed to think outside the box.
But America doesn’t want outside-the-box. At least the R2-D2-loving, Obi-Wan-Kenobi-quoting, millennium-falcon-endorsing fans don’t.
We want the entertainment we love to remain untarnished, unchanged and unoriginal.
The outcry from many a die-hard Jedi fan places far too much of an emphasis on maintaining the relics of the past rather than pushing forward with new ideas.
We need to embrace ingenuity and embrace originality, even if it means embracing the Dark side.

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