Home Features Grasp Lauren's unique perspective on love from her senior voice recital

Grasp Lauren’s unique perspective on love from her senior voice recital

Despite the nerves before performing, Lauren Tolman, a senior studying music, shared her talent with BYU-Idaho. Her gift is evident through her set of seven love songs.

“I think the moment I’m looking forward to is when I start singing, because every time I go on stage to perform, I feel so nervous,” Tolman said. “I wouldn’t say I have stage fright, but every time there are these performance jitters, I’m like, ‘What if I mess up?’ But then as soon as I start singing, it just feels like coming home. I know what I’m doing. I love this.”

Tolman showed her broad, extensive ability by singing in multiple languages such as English, Italian, German and French.

Tolman related to most of the love songs she sang.

“My husband and I met at BYU-Idaho,” Tolman said.It was super, super easy for us. As soon as we met, we were best friends. We could talk about anything. It’s been that way ever since. It’s never been a dramatic, difficult relationship, which I’m really grateful for. Especially the songs where it’s just a lot of gratitude for that love. I relate to those probably the strongest.”

She was able to feel her songs while she sang them. The pieces she chose are composed of beautiful music and are fun for her to sing. She was excited for her family to share this special moment with her.

“My mom started teaching me my first arias, art songs and things like that when I was in sixth grade,” Tolman said. “She was teaching me breathing techniques before that. It was like a part of my life already.”

She sang all the time growing up. She has five younger sisters; they would sing at old folks’ homes and perform other musical numbers together.

Tolman is always learning and has improved throughout her journey at BYU-I. She aims to look past her imperfections and continue to perfect her voice.

“Even though I’m graduating, I haven’t perfected everything that I wanted to,” Tolman said. “I know I’ve come a long way with my vocal technique and my skills in general, but there are still notes in the songs and parts that are really difficult, and I don’t get them as perfectly as I wish I would.”

Tolman strives to become a voice teacher and help her students learn how to use their gifts.

“I think there’s something really deeply personal about voice, specifically because it’s part of your body, and your voice is different than anybody else’s voice,” Tolman said. “When I was taking voice lessons in high school, I just remember the joy and the satisfaction when I would figure out something about my own voice and accomplish different milestones for myself.”

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