Home Opinion Join the fight against obesity by accepting others

Join the fight against obesity by accepting others

Jailynn-Zenger

Over the years the fight against obesity and the obsession with being thin have become trending battles at the forefront of American culture.
At the same rate, many controversies are arising at the way people are approaching the obesity problem,
and I’m not so sure people are
dealing with obese people in the right way.
According to an article in The Week, Citizens Medical Center, a health care facility in southeastern Texas, is refusing to hire anyone who has a body mass index over 35.
In other words, any person who is 5’5” can weigh no more than 210 pounds.
Officials at Citizens Medical Center said that it is a measure to promote healthy living, so that employees can set an example for patients.
Back in 2006, the CEO of Abercrombie & Fitch made the following comment about not letting certain sized people fit into their clothes: “In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids. Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don’t belong [in our clothes], and they can’t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely.”
Even though the comment was made in 2006, it has lately resurfaced and received a lot of heat.
In Andover, Mass., “fat letters” are being sent home with students from school, letting their parents know that they are categorized as obese children.
According to the Huffington Post, obesity rates among children have doubled in the last 30 years.
While obesity has become a serious problem, I’m afraid that we are more concerned with obese people than being concerned with obesity itself.
I have many family members who struggle with obesity. They are genetically more inclined to gain weight and can’t lose weight as easily. I have seen them eat healthy and try to exercise and they still struggle to drop  pounds.
People who are naturally thin sometimes cannot understand why bigger people can’t just lose the weight.
It is sad that rights are being taken away from obese people. Just like people should not be discriminated for their skin color, others should not be discriminated based on their weight.
Our culture should be more concerned with accepting people for who they are and more inclined to focus on problems that are important, like eliminating the sources of obesity.
What you look like does not affect who you are, how you act or what you are capable of.

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