Home Opinion Politics overshadowed by athletic fervor

Politics overshadowed by athletic fervor

The erroneous call at the Sept. 25 Monday night football game has incited controversy from coast to coast, rousing even the most complacent of sports fans to cry foul.
If you live in America, are connected to Facebook and have more than seven friends, you probably noticed the influx of status dates complaining about the call made by a replacement referee that ultimately cost the Green Bay Packers the game.
Cheeseheads from every corner of the nation declared their outrage and demanded an end to the referee lockout.
Earlier this summer, replacement referees — with experience ranging anywhere from high school to college fields — were hired when professional referees failed to come to an agreement for a new contract with the NFL Referees Association.
The most die-hard of fans were impatient for the pros to set aside the issue of salaries and pension plans.
Their plea was a simple one: Put those who can do the job correctly back in the game.
Now cross the 40-yard line with me to another one of the nation’s playing fields, located conveniently at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Maybe you’ve heard of it. I’ll give you a hint: It’s white.
In a campaign alarmingly reminiscent of his efforts four years ago, President Obama is in a fight to retain his standing as commander in chief.
I don’t know about you, but the thought of the past four years calls to my mind such issues as a national
deficit which now ends in a staggering amount of zeros, bitter disputes over health care with increasing costs and decreasing quality, and an unemployment rate of 8.1 percent with hundreds of hopefuls simply giving the job hunt.
Now Obama, as inexperienced in
his foreign policy as a replacement referee from Texas with its acclaimed Friday night lights is in the NFL, is trying to untangle himself from a mess in the Middle East.
As much as I roll my eyes at each “You Can Keep the Change!” bumper sticker, I can’t help but think it’s time for Obama to be held responsible for empty promises and audacious hope.
America has become a nation of athletic fervor first, political activism second. If we could get America to head to the polls with the same fervor as the Packers fans, with the intent to hold the leader of our country accountable for the promises he has made, we might actually fix something in this country.
Maybe the snubbed football fans can relate, but it’s going to take a lot more than the ehoria of a game-winning touchdown to make me feel better about the future of our country, especially if a replacement referee like Obama is calling the shots. And let’s just hope that come November, his opponent doesn’t loose by a score even close to 14-12.

RELATED ARTICLES

EDITORIAL: God bless the Rexburg roads

We at Scroll petition the city to fix burned-out streetlights, install new lights where necessary and more strictly follow the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) in maintaining road conditions.

Column: Ten years later, I’m still a junior in high school

Love has changed surprisingly little in a decade.

COLUMN: You should stop lying to your kids about Santa

The timeless tradition of Saint Nick is sweet, but lying to your kids — not just about Santa — could have some very negative outcomes. Read on to find out why.

1 COMMENT

Comments are closed.

Most Popular

5 simple electives to fill your schedule this semester

From dancing to conspiracy theories, check out this list of possible electives to take when you need a full class schedule.

Local health clinic embraces the spirit of Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Pearl Health Clinic is hosting a blood drive and health fair to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

EDITORIAL: God bless the Rexburg roads

We at Scroll petition the city to fix burned-out streetlights, install new lights where necessary and more strictly follow the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) in maintaining road conditions.

Devotional cover: Retaining honor in tough times

On Jan. 11, students and faculty gathered in the BYU-Idaho Center for the first devotional of Winter Semester 2022.

Recent Comments