Home Campus Romance Theater shows classic movies

Romance Theater shows classic movies

The Romance Theater has a hand-painted ceilin, which has been designated a historical site, according to Rexburg Arts Council’s website.  The Romance Theater will also host the singing contest “Upper Valley Idol” in February.  AUDREY HALVERSON | Scroll Photography
The Romance Theater has a hand-painted ceilin, which has been designated a historical site, according to Rexburg Arts Council’s website. The Romance Theater will also host the singing contest “Upper Valley Idol” in February.
AUDREY HALVERSON | Scroll Photography

Every Wednesday night at 7 p.m. in the Romance Theater, students and community members can enjoy a look into the past.

“It makes for a great date night,” said Seth Anderson, a servisor at the Romance Theater.

The Romance Theater shows classic movies and is located on Second East Main Street. Each ticket costs 50 cents, and concessions range from $1 to $2.

“I think older movies have more heart and soul,” said Joe Peterson a freshman studying electrical engineering

Reagan Mayfield, a senior majoring in university studies, said she went to see one of favorite classics, Rear Window, starring Jimmy Stewart.

“I love classical Alfred Hitchcock movies,” Reagan Mayfield said.

Another one of her favorite classic movies is North by Northwest.

The Romance Theater, which first opened in 1917, featured silent movies and vaudeville acts that entertained hundreds in the area, according to Rexburg.org

“Going to the movies was a big deal then, and everyone got dressed , and there would be one movie every three months, and now movies come out every week,” Reagan Mayfield said.

Amanda White, a junior studying biology, said that after learning about the background of Gone With the Wind, she better understood why it was an important movie for society during the 1940s.

With the help of community volunteers, the Romance Theater was restored to its 1930s splendor in 2005 according to the theater’s website.

“There’s already a regular movie theater that shows currents films, and Dan wanted a theater that shows

classics at a cheaper price,” Anderson said.

Some of the films the Romance Theater will show this semester include My Fair Lady, The Music Man and South Pacific. They will also show some modern “classics” such as Hercules and Tarzan.

“For the community, it brings quality films and family time and also something fun,” Anderson said.

Reagan Mayfield’s husband, Sean Mayfield, a junior studying accounting, said he enjoys classic movies as well.

“I like the classic movies because it’s like vintage storytelling,” Sean Mayfield said. “You get the good, the bad and the ugly.”

There is also a classic movie night put on by Student Activities held in the Gordon B. Hinckley Building.

This semester, three movies will be shown: The Taming of the Shrew, Citizen Kane and The Adventures of Robin Hood. Admission to BYU-I’s classic movie night is free, dates are Feb. 11, Feb. 25, and March 25.

“I feel like older movies actually have a plot, and they’re not just a remake of previous movies,” Peterson said.

Bernadette Hess, a sophomore studying nursing said her favorite classical movie is, Sound of Music, because it’s a look into a different time.

“Classic movies kind of give us a glimpse into what the 1940s were like,” Hess said.

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