Home Opinion Why we still need feminism today

Why we still need feminism today

Written by Bronwyn Challis, Assistant Copy Editor

In case you haven’t heard, the movie Wonder Woman came out last weekend, and people have a lot to say about it.

When the film was released, a movie theater in Austin, Texas announced it would be holding a women-only showing of the movie for one night.

The purpose of my piece is not to talk about this event, but rather to talk about one man, Richard A. Ameduri, and the response he felt the need to send to the mayor of Austin, Steve Adler.

According to NPR, in his email, Ameduri voiced his abhorrence for the event and proceeded to call women the “second-rate gender.”

Growing up, I always felt a strong kinship and admiration for other women and their amazing achievements.

I feel correct in saying there are many people today who feel that champions of women’s rights and equality, aka feminists, are no longer necessary and are in fact fighting a battle already won.

However, one glance at Ameduri’s bigoted, sexist email cements further in me the knowledge that feminists, aiming for greater gender equality, are needed now more than ever.

“Name something invented by a woman,” Ameduri wrote. “Achievements by the second-rate gender pale in comparison to virtually everything great in human history was accomplished by men, not women.”

Luckily for women everywhere, Adler is a feminist and read his response publicly on June 1. Adler satirically urged Ameduri to check his email for hackers, telling him he didn’t want people to think he was sexist.

“What if someone thought you didn’t know that women invented medical syringes, life rafts, fire escapes, central and solar heating, a war-time communications system for radio-controlling torpedoes that laid the technological foundations for everything from Wi-Fi to GPS, and beer?” Adler said, according to NPR.

I am thankful Adler stood as a champion for women and all who do not view others as second-rate.

If we desire to be kind, united, open-minded, loving members of the world, we cannot view others as inferior or less capable than us. Feminists are not asking for women to be treated the same as men, merely that they be deemed equal. Forever.

According to Merriam-Webster, equal means “like in quality, nature or status.” This does not imply that women are better or the same as men. Rather, they have the same worth.

I am sure that right now, men’s rights activists are coming out of the woodworks, chests bursting with refutations of how men are treated unfairly in this world. And they are not wrong. I agree there are many gender norms and social stigmas that hold men to impossible standards, causing them to feel inadequate.

However, nothing about this changes the fact that women, not men, are still far more frequently discriminated against.

In a conference address, “A Plea to My Sisters,” President Russell M. Nelson said, “So today, I plead with my sisters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to step forward! Take your rightful and needful place in your home, in your community and in the kingdom of God—more than you ever have before.”

It is impossible for women to follow President Nelson’s call when there are men like Richard A. Ameduri continuously bringing us down.

So until I live in a world where women are no longer called “second-rate” by anyone, where they are considered equal by all, I will call myself a feminist.

RELATED ARTICLES

EDITORIAL: All caffeine, no campus — a deeper look at caffeine at BYU-Idaho

BYU-I's refusal to sell any caffeinated products does not match student consumer habits or current Church teachings — we at Scroll request a policy redaction.

Living with mental illness as a BYU-I student

Putting on a face to appear strong has become my new normal.

Your body is the least interesting thing about you

Society has lead us to believe that the shape we mold our bodies into is more important than the person we become in our bodies.

5 COMMENTS

Comments are closed.

Most Popular

BREAKING NEWS: Field by Towers I parking lot catches on fire

Police are still investigating the incident.

EDITORIAL: All caffeine, no campus — a deeper look at caffeine at BYU-Idaho

BYU-I's refusal to sell any caffeinated products does not match student consumer habits or current Church teachings — we at Scroll request a policy redaction.

Shoshone-Bannock Tribes contend with COVID-19

Twenty-one deaths due to COVID-19 have been reported from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes in Fort Hall, Idaho.

Living with mental illness as a BYU-I student

Putting on a face to appear strong has become my new normal.

Recent Comments