Home Campus Student response to Honor Code changes

Student response to Honor Code changes

The BYU-Idaho Honor Code received its first major update in over 20 years on Feb. 19. In the past year, the Honor Code has undergone increased scrutiny on some of its more controversial principles.

“The honor code is very difficult for me to follow,” said Desiree Mikolyski, a freshman studying sociology. “But I think it’s a great guideline and I would like to follow it. I think nothing about it is unfair or obnoxious I just think it is pretty difficult for everyone to follow because it is detailed.”

According to Jacob Griffin, a freshman majoring in marriage and family studies, students tend to range from being “super strict” about the honor code to have a very lax attitude. He said there should be a happy medium found.

Students asked about their opinions on the recent update — consisting of the inclusion of a ban on vaping and the exclusion of specific mention about homosexual behavior — have given mixed responses.

“If it went from more specific to general, maybe they’re leaving it up to you and God and the Bishop,” Mikolyski said. “Maybe they’re wanting students to figure out for themselves where the line is and put effort into trying to figure it out rather than just following rules that are given to you easily.”

Austin Falter, a senior studying communication, said that the changes will help with false accusations that may arise in situations of same-sex interaction.

“You can see how now people can just be people and hang out,” Falter said.

Conversely, Mauri Church, a freshman studying business management, said she felt the changes don’t completely reflect the beliefs of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

“It makes no sense to take that part out,” Church said about the removal of the homosexual behavior rule.

While some students are divided in their stances, others uphold a neutral opinion.

“I believe that as long as the university upholds that the commandments are the commandments and we’re commanded also to love all men, then, of course, I would stand with the university,” said Jarom Fotheringhame, a freshman studying music.

Abbey Curtis, a senior studying construction management, has an open mind about the changes.

“Times are changing,” Curtis said. “We just kind of have to go with the flow and just trust that it’s God’s plan.”

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