Home Campus Students bring comfort items to school

Students bring comfort items to school

HALEY LUCAS | Photo Illustration Some objects provide emotional sport for people, according to Psych Central. Some scientists call this essentialism. People can feel attached to items because they hold great value for them.
HALEY LUCAS | Photo Illustration
Some objects provide emotional sport for people, according to Psych Central. Some scientists call this essentialism. People can feel attached to items because they hold great value for them.

It is not easy for a student to feel at home in college, unless they bring a part of home to school.

Hannah Holbrook, a freshman studying business, brought her baby blanket to college.

“I can’t really sleep without it,” Holbrook said.

Holbrook said she would be fine with getting rid of it but doesn’t want to and thinks it’s fine to have a comfort item.

“I don’t carry it around with me everywhere I go,” Holbrook said. “It’s only when I sleep.”

Holbrook said none of her friends make fun of her for having a baby blanket, so she’s not embarrassed.

“Every guy I have dated knows about it, but they never say anything to my face which is nice,” Holbrook said. “I’m not sure if they think it’s weird or not.”

Holbrook said her older sister is married and still has her baby blanket. She said her brother-in-law doesn’t like that Holbrook still has it.

“He tells me ‘Before you get married you have to get rid of that thing,’” Holbrook said. “‘You can’t bring that into your marriage.’”

Holbrook said her sister doesn’t see it as a problem but Holbrook’s parent’s think it is disgusting.

“My mom tells me I’m never going to find a husband if I keep it,” Holbrook said.

Holbrook said her father destroyed her younger brothers’ baby blankets when they were young.

“He was like ‘No, you will be men. You will not have baby blankets,’” Holbrook said.

Holbrook said although her baby blanket is falling apart, it’s not the look or texture that comforts her.

“It’s not the feel, it’s the smell,” Holbrook said.

People build and retain memories from inanimate objects, according to the PBS website. For example, families who were related to a victim from the 9/11 tragedy were given their family member’s possessions, according to PBS.

“These ordinary objects help them renew connections with loved ones and find healing from their loss,” according to PBS.

The website said they were simple objects like ID cards, keys or a firefighter’s helmet.

Elisabeth Witt, a senior studying elementary education, has a broken watch that keeps her connected to her aunt that died in 2002 of colon cancer.

“I believe in [comfort items]; there is a power in them,” Witt said.

Witt said her watch represents the love from her aunt.

“When my aunt was with us kids she was always so happy and radiant,” Witt said. “You could tell she loved us.”

Witt said the best part is that it is a Mickey Mouse watch.

She said it doesn’t matter that her watch doesn’t work because it used to be her aunt’s.

“It’s a piece of her with me,” Witt said.

Witt said she wears the Mickey Mouse watch when she feels scared or nervous. She said it influences her emotionally and mentally.

“I have something stable that can’t and won’t change,” Witt said.

Witt said her Mickey Mouse watch will always have the same meaning to her.

She said people shouldn’t be embarrassed by comfort items.

“A lot of us have them,” Witt said. “We just don’t want to admit to having those kind of items.”

Witt said people want to be strong and feel like they can accomplish things on their own.

“But I know I can’t and I know my family gives me that strength to conquer the world,” Witt said. “It gives me that strength to keep going.”

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