Home Campus Students taste the experience of live classical music

Students taste the experience of live classical music

The wind blew snow across the frozen ground of Rexburg late on the evening of Feb. 6. The cold broke through every layer of clothing, but inside the warmth of the Snow Recital Hall, four musicians sat with their instruments.

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Dallin Hansen, Becky Roesler, Kristina Horrocks and Robert Tueller, all professors in the Music Department, took to the stage to perform Beethoven and Schubert. Their fingers danced across their instruments as they had practiced hundreds of times before.

“It’s all about telling a story and communicating something,” Hansen, who played violin in the quartet, said. “It’s a great dynamic because each of us has our own interesting and difficult parts to play, but it doesn’t work until we’re all sort of on one page, unified.”

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The audience witnessed the performers move with the flow of the music and take breaths in sync. The musicians furrowed their brows, closed their eyes and took the occasional glance at the others as they played.

Some spectators sat in silence, fingertips pressed together and lips pursed. Others rested their heads on friends’ shoulders with their eyes closed. Seemingly oblivious to the audience before them, the quartet played on.

Special guest cellist Noriko Kishi from Salt Lake City, Utah, joined those onstage to perform a string quintet by composer Franz Schubert. Kishi played her cello with the fierce intensity of a seasoned professional.

Carter Williams, a freshman studying computer science, and Kimi Yarrington, a freshman majoring in general studies, both attended the event as a part of their Intro to Humanities class.

“I used to play violin, so I was always the one performing in the concerts that (my family and I) went to,” Yarrington said. “It’s a little scary at first, but when it’s over, you feel really accomplished.”

When the quintet came to its end, the audience rose to their feet in applause. The musicians onstage took a final bow and left the stage as audience members donned their coats and headed back out into the cold, snowy Rexburg night.

“I like to listen to a little bit of classical music when I’m studying,” Williams said. “It just kind of creates this flow for your brain and being able to witness it is kind of cool. Rather than just listen to it, you can see how it’s made, so I like that aspect.”

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