Home Campus Thespians perform in amphitheater

Thespians perform in amphitheater

NAMUUN ZULKHUU | Scroll Photography Actors practice during early rehearsals.
NAMUUN ZULKHUU | Scroll Photography
Actors practice during early rehearsals.

From July 1-3 and continuing the 8-11 is Thomas Dekker’s play “The Shoemaker’s Holiday,” which will be presented by BYU-Idaho’s theater department in the David O. McKay Library amphitheater.

Dava Tuttle, the stage manager and a senior majoring in theater studies, said the play takes place in the Elizabethan era, around the time of William Shakespeare.

Tuttle said she enjoys the opportunity of being stage manager and helping the director. She said it is a different atmosphere to help other casts instead of acting on stage where she’s most comfortable.

“The role of the stage manager is to make sure everything runs smoothly, so you kind of have your thumb in every pudding, making sure the acts get memorized, the stage gets built and that everything runs on time and on task,” Tuttle said.

She said many of the play’s cast members, are on stage for their first time, and it is the Theater Department’s first time putting “The Shoemaker’s Holiday” into production in the library amphitheater.

“This show is quite a bit of a premiere, and I think it’s awesome to be in that position where we can be the first,” Tuttle said. “We’re pioneering this area and this show.”

Mary Gritis, one of the costume designers and a senior majoring in theatre studies, said she came in at the beginning of the semester to help with production by assisting the other designers in imitating the Elizabethan era’s style of clothing.

“I came in for trims and for fittings, figuring everyone’s lives out, and getting everyone scheduled in the same place so we could put pretty clothes on everyone,” Gritis said.

Gritis said most of the outfits have an unnatural body shape.

The clothes go straight out from the hips like a shelf and the men get to wear tights.

“I have always loved clothes, probably more than I should, and I didn’t realize that’s what I was going to do with my life,” Gritis said. “The best part to me is seeing it all come together and become a cohesive show.”

Gritis said that using an all new space in the amphitheater presents new difficulties.

She said she enjoys the experience and the new opportunities that have been provided to make the play different from the other plays done in the past.

“‘Create as far as that goes,’ that’s the whole theater process,” Gritis said. “I think what is great is that [“The Shoemaker’s Holiday”] presented a lot of unique challenges to do in this show than any other ones.”

Katie Holland, one of the make artists and a junior majoring in theater studies, helps do basic correctives on the cast, emphasizing natural shadows and highlights on the face.

“The main part is that we’re just making sure on stage, under all the lights, you don’t get washed out and people can still see your face and what expressions you’re making,” Holland said.

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